BMW recalling 1 million vehicles in North America

WASHINGTON, Nov 3 (Reuters) – BMW AG said on Friday it is recalling about 1 million vehicles in North America for two separate issues involving fire risks and said it may expand the recalls to other countries.

One recall covers 670,000 2006-2011 U.S. 3-Series vehicles to address a wiring issue for heating and air conditioning systems that may overheat and could increase the risk of a fire.

The second recall covers 740,000 U.S. 2007-2011 vehicles with a valve heater that could rust and lead to a fire in rare cases. The recall includes some 128i vehicles, 3-Series, 5-Series and X3, X5 and Z4 vehicles.

BMW spokesman Michael Rebstock said the recalls overlap and cover about 1 million vehicles, nearly all in the United States and about 15,000 in Canada. He said the recalls may be expanded.

“We are examining whether it will be necessary in the future to widen this (recall) into other countries,” he said.

BMW said both recalls followed recent meetings with the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

In the heating and air conditioning recall, BMW told NHTSA it first got a report of an incident in 2008 involving heat- related damage to a 2006 3-Series sedan, but did not determine a root cause. The automaker continued to monitor additional field incidents in the following years.

In 2011, BMW made a quality improvement to the blower-regulator wiring harness. No injuries were reported between 2007 and 2014, but in 2015, BMW was made aware of three incidents in which there were allegations of injuries. In early September, BMW learned of another incident involving a 2011 BMW 3 Series vehicle.

Dealers will replace a wiring harness if necessary and potentially additional parts.

In the valve heater issue recall, BMW first received a report in 2009 of an incident in a 2007 X5 involving heat-related damage to the engine compartment, the company told NHTSA. It received other reports and continued to review the issue and inspect returned parts, but had no reports of injuries or crashes related to the issue. Dealers will replace the valve heater.

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Massive Kidde fire extinguisher recall affects some automotive versions

Nov 2 (Reuters) – United Technologies Corp’s Kidde unit is recalling more than 40 million fire extinguishers mainly in the United States, a U.S. consumer safety agency said on Thursday, following reports that they failed to work and caused one death in 2014. You can view the recalled model identification guide right here.

Kidde, a safety products maker, will recall 37.8 million fire extinguishers in the United States and 2.7 million in Canada, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said.

The fire extinguishers could become clogged or need excessive force to discharge, and as a result, can fail to activate during an emergency, the CPSC said.

There have been 391 reports of failed or limited activation of the fire extinguishers, including 16 injuries and the death from 2014, that was the result of a car crash, the agency added.

The recall includes 134 models of Kidde plastic handle fire extinguishers made between 1973 and August 2017, including models that were previously recalled in 2009 and 2015.

Eight models of Kidde’s push-button Pindicator fire extinguishers made between 1995 and September 2017 are also being recalled. (Reporting by Pranav Kiran in Bengaluru; Editing by Sai Sachin Ravikumar)

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Honda recalls 2.1 million Accords worldwide over fire risk

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Honda Motor Co said on Friday it would recall about 2.1 million vehicles worldwide to replace battery sensors due to the risk of fire.

Chris Martin, a spokesman for the Japanese automaker said the recall would include 1.15 million Honda Accord vehicles from the 2013-2016 model years in the United States, and nearly 1 million elsewhere, to replace a 12-volt battery sensor.

Meanwhile, the 2018 Honda Accord was revealed Friday.

The company said it had received four reports of engine compartment fires in the United States and at least one in Canada, in areas that use significant amounts of road salt during the winter. There have been no reported injuries.

The automaker has received 3,972 U.S. warranty claims relating to the issue.

The battery sensors may not be sufficiently sealed against moisture intrusion, Honda said. Over time, moisture may introduce road salt or other material into the battery sensor, leading to rust and eventual electrical shorting of the sensor.

Due to the large size of the recall, Honda said dealers would initially adopt a temporary fix by applying an adhesive to prevent moisture intrusion, and then later replace the sensor.

The company first received a claim of an engine compartment fire from Canada in 2015 and began investigating the issue. In early 2016, it received a claim of a similar fire in China.

Honda introduced a redesigned battery sensor in June 2016. After an investigation of the China incident, the automaker said it initially believed the “future occurrence rate was estimated to be low,” but continued to probe the matter after receiving additional reports of fires.

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